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Dallas Women’s Foundation Releases The Economic Status of Women in Texas on International Women’s Day, March 8

March 8, 2018  |  Leave a Comment

Texas women wait until 2049 for equal pay

DALLAS, March 8, 2018 – On International Women’s Day, Dallas Women’s Foundation released studies analyzing the status of women in Texas, and more specifically, in Collin, Dallas and Denton Counties. The Economic Status of Women in Texas and The Economic Status of Women in Collin, Dallas and Denton Counties, which were produced in collaboration with the Institute for Women’s Policy Research, offer comprehensive insights regarding trends in employment, earnings, health insurance, education, poverty and opportunity. Despite some positive trends, Texas still needs improvement.

 

Roslyn Dawson Thompson, president and CEO, Dallas Women’s Foundation, said, “Although women in Texas have made progress, they still face inequities that prevent them from reaching their full potential. If trends continue, Texas women will not achieve equal pay until 2049. If Texas women were paid the same as men, their average annual earnings would be $7,300 higher, and their poverty rate would be reduced by 51 percent. In addition, Texas receives a C- for women’s employment and earnings and a D for women’s poverty and opportunity, grades that decreased and remained the same, respectively, since the 2004 study was conducted.”

She added, “Our goal with the study is to showcase the achievements women have made, and also highlight what more we must do to increase opportunities and equity for Texas women.”

Report Highlights:

Employment, Wages and Labor Force:

  • Women in Texas ages 16 and older who work full-time, year-round have median annual earnings of $37,400, which is 6 cents on the dollar compared with similarly-employed men.
  • Women’s median earnings in Dallas County are similar to the state average, $37,511, while women in Denton and Collin counties have higher annual earnings ($46,362 and $50,691, respectively.) Asian/Pacific Islander women in Collin County have the highest earnings, at $64,907 annually, and Hispanic women in Dallas County have the lowest earnings, at $25,345.
  • The gender wage gap is smallest in Dallas County, where women earn 92.6 cents on the dollar compared with men. The gap is much wider in Denton County at 76.2 percent, and Collin County at 70.3 percent.
  • Hispanic women in Collin, Dallas, and Denton counties who work full-time, year-round earn less than half of white men’s earnings; in Dallas County, Hispanic women earn just 4 cents for every dollar earned by white men in the county.
  • About 58 percent of women in Texas ages 16 and older are in the labor force. The labor force participation rate in all three counties—Collin (62.9 percent), Dallas (61.7 percent), and Denton (66.6 percent)—is higher than in the state overall. Among women, black women have the highest labor force participation rate in each county.
  • A growing share of employed women in Texas are in managerial or professional occupations. About 40 percent of women in Texas hold these positions, which tend to require a four-year degree and often have higher wages and employment benefits. The share of employed women in managerial or professional occupations varies by county, from a low of 37.9 percent in Dallas County to a high of 53.9 percent in Collin County. Hispanic women in Collin, Dallas, and Denton counties are the racial/ethnic group of women least likely to be employed in managerial or professional occupations.

Education:

  • Approximately 29 percent of women ages 25 and older in Texas have a bachelor’s degree or higher. Educational attainment among women varies widely by race and ethnicity. Less than 10 percent of Hispanic women in Dallas County have a bachelor’s or advanced degree, while over 70 percent of Asian/Pacific Islander women in Collin County have that level of education.

Health Insurance:

  • Seventy-eight percent of Texas’s women ages 18 to 64 have health insurance coverage, which is below the national average for women (89.4 percent). Fewer than three in four women in Dallas County have health insurance (74.0 percent), while 85.8 percent of women in Denton County and 87.7 percent of women in Collin County have coverage. In all three counties, Hispanic women are the least likely to have health insurance.

Women-Owned Businesses:

  • In Texas, 36.8 percent of businesses are owned by women, slightly above the national average of 35.8 percent, and up from 28.2 percent in 2007.

Poverty Levels:

  • Texas ranks 34th nationally for women in poverty; 17 percent of Texas women ages 18 and older live in poverty, compared with 14.2 percent of Texas men.
  • Smaller shares of women in Collin and Denton counties are poor (7.4 and 10.1 percent). Comparing women in the three counties, white women in Collin County have the lowest poverty rate at 5.3 percent, and Hispanic women in Dallas County have the highest poverty rate at 22.8 percent.

To see the full reports and release, visit https://www.dallaswomensfdn.org

About The Status of Women in Texas:

The Status of Women in Texas is produced by the Institute for Women’s Policy Research with Dallas Women’s Foundation. International Women’s Day celebrates the social, economic, cultural and political achievements of women with a goal of accelerating gender parity.

About The Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR):

IWPR conducts rigorous research and disseminates its findings to address the needs of women, promote public dialogue, and strengthen families, communities and societies. The Institute’s research strives to give voice to the needs of women from diverse ethnic and racial backgrounds across the income spectrum and to ensure that their perspectives enter the public debate on ending discrimination and inequality, improving opportunity, and increasing economic security for women and families. More information can be found at www.iwpr.org

About Dallas Women’s Foundation:

Dallas Women’s Foundation is the largest regional women’s fund in the world. It is a trusted leader in advancing positive social and economic change for women and girls. The Foundation was built on the belief that when you invest in a woman, there is a ripple effect that benefits her family, her community and her world. Dallas Women’s Foundation has researched, funded and demonstrated the ripple effect since 1985 in North Texas, granting more than $37.6 million since inception and over $4.5 million annually to help create opportunities and solve issues for women and girls. With the support of its donors, the Foundation unlocks resources to improve education and quality of life, give voice to issues affecting women and girls, and cultivate women leaders for the future. For more information, visit www.DallasWomensFdn.org, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, or Instagram.

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